Versatile Blogger Award WOOHOO!

 

Among the fabulous comments and notes I received during my little hiatus from the blogosphere, I was thrilled to find that a fellow blogger (and fabulous fibro chick) had nominated me for the Versatile Blogger Award!

 

You like me… you really like me!

 

Now this is awesome on several fronts. Thank you very much, Miss Chrissy Faery, for the nomination. Y’all should probably go check out her blog, because it’s pretty effin cool. So winning this distinguished honor comes with two responsibilities: telling your readers 7 fun or interesting things about yourself, and nominating 15 other awesome bloggers for the award. I have decided to split this up into two posts, in order to completely milk the awesome good feelings for all they’re worth. Er- I mean to give both aspects of my nomination the respect they deserve. So here we go, ladies and germaphobes – seven things you didn’t know about me!

 

  1. I want to write a killer romance novel

I absolutely love the idea of penning a sexy, smart, witty romance or chick lit novel. Which is actually pretty surprising to those that know me, because I tend to be a bit of an anti-chick. I’d rather watch the Exorcist than the Notebook. What can I say? Which brings me to…

 

  1. I’m fascinated by the paranormal

Ghosts, hauntings, possessions, Santeria, mediums, spirit communication… anything that gives us a clue as to what happens when we leave this physical world has always fascinated me. I love Long Island Medium and American Horror Story, and writing paranormal fiction is on my writer’s wish list.

 

  1. I’m a complete audiophile

Whether I’m writing, cooking, cleaning, or mindlessly updating my Twitter status, I’ve almost always got music playing. Sometimes I think my Skull Candy earbuds are an extension of my physical being. My tastes are pretty eclectic, too. A quick glimpse of my recent playlists reveal everything from Frank Sinatra. Train and The Sex Pistols to Pink, Maroon 5 and Martina McBride, with a million things in between.

 

  1. I love to cook

Getting my kitchen on is an awesome way to let my creative freak flag fly, and I’m all about it. I’ll try new things all the time. And I love to make up my own recipes.

 

  1. I can be really mean to myself.

There are things I can control. There are also a lot of things I can’t. But just because something is completely out of my control doesn’t necessarily mean I won’t beat myself up over it. This is especially true of things that limit me, like my lupus and fibromyalgia. If I’m too sick to work as much as I like, or if I have to put something off for later or leave a function early, I take it tough and immediately get down on myself. I’m working on this.

 

  1. My cat is as clumsy as I am… and that’s saying something

I have an all black cat, named Onyx. I love her. I really do. I think she might need glasses. Her depth perception is way off. She falls off of things, like the bed, on a regular basis. The other day she fell into the bathtub where I was soaking. I’m still wearing the battle scars. The thing is, I completely understand her. I once set my own hair on fire. I have clumsiness issues of my own. So, really she’s more of a familiar than a pet.

onyx 001

  1. Despicable Me is one of my favorite movies, ever

You could say that I have a very young aspect to my personality. That being said, I absolutely LOVE those “children’s” movies that have as many jokes geared towards adults as for kids. Despicable Me is possibly my favorite of these. My boyfriend gave me my own minion (stuffed, sadly) for my birthday. His name is Dave and he rocks.

 

So there you have it, guys. Seven things you probably didn’t know about me! Next post, I will give you all my list of 15 Versatile Blogger nominees, so that you can go out and explore their fantabulous blogs on your own! Till then… ASSEMBLE THE MINIONS!

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Where There’s a Will…

 

 

Late the other night, I was awake and in pain and perusing ye olde Facebook in an attempt to find entertainment and, perhaps, something that would miraculously lull me to bed. Instead, I stumbled across something that both angered and hurt me. Here’s how it all went down:

 

I noticed that someone had posted something on the fibromyalgia support page. She was asking if anyone was familiar with the side effects of certain medications often prescribed to FM. It just so happened that I had tried all three of the prescriptions she mentioned, and went ahead and shared what I knew about Cymbalta, Lyrica and Savella. And then I saw it.

 

Amidst the many comments and questions was a woman who said that medications don’t work for things like fibromyalgia, and that really, all that the original poster needed to do was “breathe deep and will the pain away.”

 

Normally, I would have just dismissed the ignorant comment. But I was feeling particularly defeated, and something about her statement really hit me in the gut.

 

Here’s the thing, guys. When people make statements akin to “all you have to do is set your mind to it…” it implies that a person’s symptoms are all in their head. Or that they’re exaggerating. Or that they can simply will away their pain. Which would be awesome. I mean, if I could take a deep breath and suddenly not be in agony every time I move, I’d be all over it.

 

But I can’t.

 

Telling someone with a chronic condition to stop taking their medication and just will themselves better is not only insensitive, it’s downright dangerous. I’ve had people tell me I just need to get out more, or that a good night’s sleep is all it would take to make me right as rain. I’ve had people tell me that everyone feels achy sometimes and to stop being so dramatic about it all.

 

And every one of those statements is another tiny chip at my well built-up armor.

 

So here’s the thing, everyone. Before you assume that someone’s condition is all in their head, or that they are faking the extent of their symptoms, simply take a quick peek online. A little research, a peek at an online forum, even a gander at some Tweets will probably be all it takes to give you a better idea of what it’s like to live with something you are unfamiliar with.

 

You’d be surprised at how much it means to someone when you take a few minutes to try and see what they’re going through…

What Was I Talking About Again?

 

So Saturday night, I was in my kitchen, baking a cake to take to a family Mother’s Day celebration the next afternoon. And I was confused. Seriously confused.

 

Sure, I had flour in my hair and a vague handprint on the butt of my shorts, but that’s not what was confusing me. Hey, that’s pretty much par for the course for me when it comes to baking. I love to get all creative in the kitchen, and can cook a five course meal without a problem, but can’t seem to create a dessert without creating a subsequent mess all over myself. No, my befuddlement was a direct result of simple math.

 

See, I was doubling the recipe for cake batter, in order to create a two layer cake for my grandma. And that meant I needed to figure out what 2/3 of a cup of melted butter was, twice. Pretty basic calculation, and on any other day I would have quickly melted up a cup and a third and been on with my mixing and mess-making. Only that’s not how it worked. I was just standing there, butter dripping onto my socks, concentrating as hard as I could to figure this out. And the harder I tried, the cloudier my thoughts became. It was like trying to add simple numbers with a head full of oatmeal.

 

Fibro fog. Brain fog. Cognitive dysfunction. Call it what you like, it’s one of the most frustrating and difficult aspects of fibromyalgia to deal with. Whether it comes from the sleep disturbances that accompany fibromyalgia or as a result of your brain’s response to all that pain, or another reason altogether, doctors still aren’t sure what causes the memory loss, clouded thinking, confusion and panic attacks that come compromise fibro fog.

 

For me, brain fog is also one of the hardest symptoms to try and explain to other people, as well. How do articulate that your mind seizes up and simply won’t work? How do explain that you walked into the same room four times and still can’t remember what you’re doing there? Or that you suddenly can’t remember how to spell basic words or add 2/3 and 2/3? And that the harder you try the more likely you are to fly into a blind panic about the whole thing?

 

I guess you just try your best. And, when you can’t add measurements, remember that Google is your best friend.